Category Archives: Tips Tricks and Productivity

Teacher and Academia Productivity Tips and Tricks

Being Productive while Teaching is a Challenge. If you’re a university professor, there’s service and research too! And you’re supposed to keep a work-life balance? Sheesh!

Below, you’ll learn how to rev up your output, both inside and outside of university life, all while keeping your sanity.

The Power of the Micro Screencast: How Educators Can create GIFs to Save Time and Enhance Learning

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Everyone loves GIFs. As I’m sure you  know, you can now easily search Twitter for GIPHY.com Gifs to share. They seem to be everywhere.

But how can GIFs enhance your job as a professor and help your students learn more all while saving you time?

Continue reading The Power of the Micro Screencast: How Educators Can create GIFs to Save Time and Enhance Learning

Edit Faster: Stop Wasting Time with Unnecessary Scrolling in Microsoft Word

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Hope summer is off to a great start! If you’re like me, summer means writing, writing, writing!

As I like to do once in a while, I thought I’d share another productivity tip for professors.

Today’s tip has to do with Microsoft Word. This is a favorite feature of MS Word I use all the time for grading, research writing, or just about anything else.

Continue reading Edit Faster: Stop Wasting Time with Unnecessary Scrolling in Microsoft Word

What I’ve learned in 10 Years of Teaching College (And Why I Give My Students High Fives)

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It is hard to believe. But, I’ve just completed teaching at the university level for 10 academic years.

At the age of 24, I  began teaching as a graduate student in 2006 at Washington State University where I independently taught 2 classes a semester for 4 years. I had no idea what I was doing. I was barely older than the seniors. With a textbook in hand and the summer to prepare, I jumped right in.

As of this past Friday, I have completed 6 years of teaching as an assistant professor. All of that has been working with undergraduates.

Continue reading What I’ve learned in 10 Years of Teaching College (And Why I Give My Students High Fives)

Three Types of Goals Academics Should Set for 2016

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As I look back, 2015 has been a great year for me professionally. I’m always amazed at how much can change in a year and how much we grow in our profession in such a short period of time. As our careers progress in academia, it is as important as ever that we set goals and use winter break to push ourselves forward.

I’ve always been one to set goals both for the short and long terms.  And I attribute a great deal of my productivity and success to goal-setting. Here are 3 types of goals I value.

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#Hokies Tweets Network Visualization: How I extracted Tweets via TAGS 6 and visualized them in Gephi

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Click to see larger or download.
Click to see larger or download.

A professional development goal of mine is to learn a lot more about social network analysis and visualization of social media data. This area has grown increasingly valuable and important in our field.  And I believe we all need to have at least a base knowledge of social data and how to play with it.

Continue reading #Hokies Tweets Network Visualization: How I extracted Tweets via TAGS 6 and visualized them in Gephi

Time Management: How to Read when You Don’t Have Time with These Tricks

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I like to write posts every once in a while about productivity tips and tricks or time savers. That’s because I know I love reading these types of posts and believe maybe some of the tricks I’ve picked up along the way might help others.

I wrote the below blog post months ago but never got around to publishing it. When I came across the Umano  app yesterday I was so happy. I was also reminded about the below post I’d drafted.

Continue reading Time Management: How to Read when You Don’t Have Time with These Tricks

Google Scholar Tutorial: Power User’s Guide: Research Recommendations (3 of 3)

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Google Scholar Tutorial: Part 3 – Getting the Most From Research Recommendations

This is the third and final post on what’s been a popular Google Scholar Tutorial on becoming a Google Scholar power user.

This post about the Recommendations feature comes last because you must have a Google Scholar profile in order to use it.

In past blog posts, I’ve written about great ways to find research articles for your literature review. Specifically, I’ve talked about using Google Scholar search, and the Mendeley search option.

Google Scholar recommended research is another way of finding research articles that I’m loving. It is super easy to use and I’ve found tons of articles I wouldn’t have found before. As you recall, these recommendations are based on your citations – in other words, what you’ve published online. So of course they are going to be tailored to your research interests.

Google Scholar recommendations
Click to enlarge.

If you have your Google Scholar profile set up, Google Scholar will recommend new research articles to you based on your publications. So the recommendations are almost always super relevant and helpful for future studies!

To access these, go to scholar.google.com and click “My Updates” at the top.

Also, Google Scholar will often list the most recent recommendations under the search bar at scholar.google.com. You can get the rest by clicking “see all updates” (see photo above)

Here are my recommended articles today:

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

Tailored scholarly article recommendations – what could be better?

Hope you enjoyed this series of posts on Google Scholar! If you did, please share this post!

Other articles in series:

-Cheers!

Matt