Category Archives: Activities and Events

What I learned from hosting a Facebook live interview

This year, the social media committee of the Public Relations Division of AEJMC wanted to make some changes in how we conduct our interviews with senior faculty and practitioners.

For several years, interviews have been published on the PRD blog in written format. We thought it would be fun to put a fresh spin on things.

Ai Zhang, who hosts an awesome Facebook Live show “Classroom Without Walls: Using Technology to Reimagine Education,” suggested using Facebook Live to conduct the interviews.

So, we came up with the PRD Ask Me Anything (AMA) series with Senior Faculty and Practitioners. Based on the popular AMA format on Reddit, we solicited questions from PRD members to then pose to the interviewee during the live interview. The interviews are hosted live on the AEJMC PRD Facebook page at a publicized time.

I recently had the honor of hosting our first ever PRD AMA with  Dr. Tiffany Gallicano, past head of the PRD and faculty member at UNC Charlotte.

If you missed it, the interview is full of wonderful advice from Dr. Gallicano on how balancing work and family life, preparing for tenure, keeping one’s research current in an ever changing media landscape, and more. I was particularly inspired by her advice to focus on teaching preparation as a new faculty member, which to me demonstrated a thorough and passionate commitment to pedagogy and to her students.  I also was very impressed with how Tiffany manages to find a unique work/life balance as well as how she harnesses her energy to maximize her productivity.

You can watch the full interview below. If the embedded player does not load, you can find the PRD AMA interview with Dr. Gallicano here.

 

Having never conducted a Facebook Live interview and having only gone live on Facebook one time before, I had a lot to learn. Here are 4 things I picked up in preparing for my interview:

  1. If you want to grow, you must take the plunge.

This first thing I learned is really a reminder/advice to myself.

I’ll admit, I was rather nervous to conduct the interview. I’ve always seen myself as a ‘behind the scenes’ kind of person. That is, I like promoting ideas and people. But,   I’ve always been a bit camera shy.

Thus, I have been reticent about using Snapchat and about entering the livestreaming era of social media. In this way, I have limited my own growth in the social space. Said another way, as the social media landscape and culture has changed towards the self-facing camera, I have studied it, taught it, and kept up to date with it. But, I haven’t much participated in it.

I wanted to do this Facebook Live show because I wanted to give myself a reason to take the plunge and get in front of the camera.

I’m glad I did. I found the experience  nerve racking but exhilarating.  As soon as I got off the call, I started brainstorming ideas for my own Facebook Live show.  Hopefully, I’ll find the time to put it together and make it a reality. No matter what, I’m going to force myself to get in front of the camera more often.

2. Get on the call with your interviewee 30 minutes in advance.

Dr. Gallicano was kind enough to get on the call with me 30 minutes in advance to prepare for the call as well as to test and make sure everything was working correctly. We noticed that the sound was lagging. So, we tried to close some programs on our computers in the hopes that it would speed things up. When that didn’t work, we both restarted our computers and got back on the call. This took a bit of time and, had we not had the 30 minutes, we would have had to start the call late.

2. Prepare talking points. And print them.

I wrote out an outline of the call, which I shared with Dr. Gallicano.

In addition, I had a basic script of what I wanted to say and highlighted specific sentences I wanted to make sure I said exactly right as well as the questions that I had received from PRD members.

I had the script up on my computer. But, I also printed it and posted it on the cork board directly behind my computer just in case. I didn’t want to have too many windows open on my computer and be navigating around while on the call.  In the interview, there was too much going on on my screen to pop back and forth between the BeLive software and my notes. Thus, I ended up relying on the version I had printed. If you look closely to the interview, you can probably see my eyes looking slightly above my camera when I was looking at the script directly above my computer.

4. Be prepared. Then, be prepared for little things to go wrong anyways. AKA, expect the unexpected.

We used BeLive to conduct the interview so that the split screen interview could be done via desktop computers.

I spent a good amount of time playing with BeLive on my own, watching interviews others had conducted on Facebook Live, and learning everything I could about live streaming to Facebook. I even did a brief promotional Facebook Live video a few days ahead of time so that I could have experience going live with BeLive on Facebook Live before conducting the interview. But, when we did the actual interview, something went wrong and I didn’t notice it. For some reason, the first few seconds of the interview worked and viewers could see and hear us. Then, immediately following, the screen was black and we could not be heard by the audience on the PRD Facebook page.

Unfortunately, I had not loaded the PRD Facebook page so that i could see the Facebook Live interview from the viewer’s perspective. Thus, I was not aware that this was happening. I had been concerned about feedback from the live interview playing on my computer while I was trying to conduct the interview. Because BeLive said that we were live and I could see we had a few viewers, I assumed everything was working just great. It wasn’t until a viewer commented that she could not see or hear us, that I realized what had happened. I had to close the Facebook Live broadcast and restart it. Fortunately, everything worked during the second time around. But, during the time that the audience couldn’t see us, Dr. Gallicano had given a wonderful answer to the first question I had posed to her during the interview. And, no one got a chance to hear it. Fortunately, Dr. Gallicano was very gracious and repeated her answer to the question during the second broadcast.

Next time, I’ll be sure to load up the live interview to make sure it is working, mute it, and keep an eye on it. 🙂

In summary, I had a lot of fun conducting this interview with Dr. Gallicano. Dr. Gallicano is one of the most generous, gracious, knowledgeable and passionate educator/scholars I have had the opportunity to speak with. I learned a ton from her. If you haven’t yet checked out the PRD AMA with Senior Faculty & Practitioner series, you can find the other interview that has been hosted thus far. It is with Dr. Denise Bortree, PRD past head and associate professor at Penn State, by going to the PRD Facebook page or by clicking here.

 

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3 Ways to Use Slack to Foster Student Team Work in The College Class

I had a great time this past weekend presenting at the PRSA Educator’s Academy Super Saturday with Ai Zhang, Karen Freberg and moderator Kirk Hazlett.

If you missed our presentation, we covered how social media tools can be used to break down the classroom walls. #EdWithoutWalls

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You can watch a rebroadcast of the Facebook Live Stream that Karen Freberg did.

I had the opportunity to discuss my experience using Slack in education settings. I’ve used it both in the classroom as well as for student groups that I’ve worked with.

Because of time, I presented a short version of the presentation at Super Saturday. So, I’d I’d like to share with the unabridged slides on using Slack for student teams in class projects.

This presentation goes a little further into depth about chat bots, their rise, and their potential for educators/the classroom.

(See the presentation on SlideShare.net)

I got several questions and compliments  about the GIFs I made and used in the slides (note: The Slideshare version doesn’t show the GIFs. But, if you download the slides you can see them in presenter mode).

I created them using Recordit.  A few weeks ago, I wrote a blog post about how to use GIFS to enhance your teaching if you’d like to learn more.

It was great to see everyone and make new connections. I learned a ton. I look forward to seeing everyone soon and continuing to learn from everyone as we all work to build and share knowledge in social media education.

-Cheers!
Matt

 

 

 

Summer Break Update

Summer is in full swing. And I’ve got a busy summer ahead. As always, during the summer months I will be toning back my frequency of posting on this blog. I do have a few things I’ll post here and there. Not to worry, I’ll be picking up full steam with my regular publication schedule of posting every 2 weeks during the academic year.

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This blog tends to get a lot of traffic in summer in relation assignments and syllabi  that I have shared over the years.

Assignments:

If you are looking for assignments and syllabi, you’ll see that I’ve written about many of my assignments and included the assignment documents themselves.

To access those select the green menu bar at the top titled “Blog topics” -> “Teaching Social Media” -> “Classes” and then select the class.

Syllabi:

Syllabi can be accessed either via the “Syllabi” menu at the top of this blog and selecting the course, or by selecting the “Teaching Materials” menu and navigating to an external document repository to access all my uploaded syllabi.

If you have questions about any of the assignments or syllabi, please do not hesitate to send me a Tweet. I’d be happy to chat.

A few Quick Updates

I am super excited to announce that I earned tenure and will be an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication this upcoming fall.  The adventure to earning tenure was a lot of work, but I had a ton of fun and made sure not to stress too much about it. I am excited now for the projects and opportunities before me.

What do I have planned for the summer?

Lots of things. As always, I’ll be tweaking classes and assignments here and there. In fact, I’ve already developed a new project for my Communication Research class in the hopes of enhancing the tie in of social media data and software into that class (I’ll blog about this in the spring when I teach the class again). A few highlights include:

  • Preparing my Persuasion and Message Design Course which I will be teaching for the first time next semester.
  • Traveling to Australia – I’ll be spending a few weeks “down under.”
  • Social Network Analysis class – I’m planning to work through this free online social network analysis MOOC by Leonid Zhukov and Dr. Ilya Makarov to enhance my knowledge of social network analysis.
  • Service projects – I’m working with a non-profit to assist them with a global digital communication project.
  • Research – Working on a small grant I got with research colleagues to prepare for our upcoming study of the upcoming presidential election. I’m also working on a few other projects.
  • Studying Spanish – I’ve always wanted to learn a second language and I plan to spend some free time learning a little.
  • Reading several books – mostly books of personal interest. But there are a few social media books have been recommended to me I’m hoping to get time to get around to.
  • Other creative projects? I’ve been bouncing around the idea of starting a podcast (I have a few ideas) or starting a separate blog for some area of personal growth (e.g., organization, productivity, or similar vein of self improvement), writing a book, or some other type of creative project. Feel free to Tweet your thoughts, feedback, or suggestions on these to me!

I hope you have a wonderful summer! I hope you get to both relax and work on the projects that fuel and inspire you!  Stay in touch! I’ll see you soon!

-Matt

Study Explores Hootsuite University in the College Classroom

Frequent readers of this blog know that I’ve been using Hootsuite University in my social media class for some time now.  But, how does using Hootsuite University impact social media learning?

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That’s the broad question I set out to explore in a research study co-authored with professors Emily S. Kinsky, Karen Freberg, Carolyn Kim, and William Ward.

Our study was recently published in the Journal of Public Relations Education, after being presented as the top teaching research paper in the Public Relations Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication last August.

Hootsuite summarized the article and its findings in a blog post titled “Social Media Education Empowers the Next Generation of Marketing Mavens.”

I’m honored and pleased with reactions to the study thus far.  To date, the Slideshare version of the article (embedded below) has received over 3,700 views since its publication about a week ago.

You can also read the study online or download the PDF via its page on Journal of Public Relations Education’s website.

Three Types of Goals Academics Should Set for 2016

As I look back, 2015 has been a great year for me professionally. I’m always amazed at how much can change in a year and how much we grow in our profession in such a short period of time. As our careers progress in academia, it is as important as ever that we set goals and use winter break to push ourselves forward.

I’ve always been one to set goals both for the short and long terms.  And I attribute a great deal of my productivity and success to goal-setting. Here are 3 types of goals I value.

How to set goals in academia

First, and often overlooked, are the goals that focus on process; the things we must do to achieve the desired results, Without these, we cannot achieve outcomes. But many people set goals focused solely on outcomes without thinking of the day-to-day things they must do to realize those outcomes. Second, are outcome goals – goals in our direct line of sight that focus on attainable outcomes.  They result from the processes we do. Third,  are bigger picture “dreams”; the sort of thing that you don’t quite have a plan for exactly but they’ve been in your mind and you feel like you are working towards them in one way or another. It is important to have long-term goals that extend beyond a year and/or big picture dreams, because without these we can lose sight of what inspires us. Put another way, the only way to “be big” (accomplish big things) is to “think big.”

In the spirit of new year’s resolutions, I’d like to briefly share examples of each of these types of goals that I have. I hope that by sharing these, they get you thinking about your academic goals for 2016.  Below are 2 process goals  – the things it takes to achieve our goals, 2 outcome goals – things I want to accomplish, as well as one “think big” goal that is rolling around in my head.

Process Goals:

  1. Staying Relevant As Social Media Matures – The field is constantly changing. It is both a blessing and a curse. I’ve worked hard this past year to make small adjustments to stay on top of things going on in the field as well as trying to take advantage of some of the amazing opportunities that have been presented to me. Often times,  the small changes are easier to realize than the big ones. But, that doesn’t’ mean small changes are easy to do.  Often time complacency is the curse of progress. We get comfortable where we are and before we know it, enough time has passed that we have fallen behind. As a professor, it is easy to look at the syllabus from last year and just stick with what we’ve been doing rather than updating. That is why I  feel it is a priority to be constantly scanning the environment and staying proactive in making these small changes – such as to my syllabi and course content. Doing so, means avoiding major problems down the line. I spent the first week of winter break working on updates and changes for next semester. Of course, I’ll share some of them this upcoming  semester on this blog. 🙂 One activity I’m really excited about is the BuzzFeed writing assignment we’ll be doing in my Writing Across Platforms class.
  2. Becoming More Effective With My Time – Productivity is something I think a lot about . As someone who is a bit of a workaholic, I’m never sitting still. I live on Wunderlist. I’m always thinking of things I’d like to or need to get done. There are so many exciting things to learn and do, and I like to think I’m interested in interesting things. 🙂 I feel I’m very good at completing tasks ahead of time, staying organized, and always doing what I say I will. But, with so many distractions today, I’ve found myself becoming less productive with my time. Time spent working doesn’t always equate to tasks completed. Too, I tend to focus very heavily on details and am a bit of a perfectionist – I think that’s the curse of being an academic. 🙂 So, the goal for 2016 is to use time more efficiently. If I can do that, I can increase productivity, opening time for new opportunities as well as to enjoy personal time. I’m exploring a few different ways to do this.  I read that one way to do this, is to track how you spend your time – the way you track your personal finances – to see where your resources are being spent. That way, you can get a baseline and see opportunities to optimize. So, I’m playing with using a time-tracking app such as Time Meter. I’ve also recently downloaded a fun little game called Forest that motivates you to not fall into the habit of ‘phone distraction.’  In recent months, I’ve gotten particularly bad at this. I think we can all benefit from taking back our time!

Outcome Goals:

  1. Maximizing Educational Opportunities for My Students  –  Related to #2 above, I’ve been very fortunate that some new opportunities have presented themselves. Continuing to grow and build connections, in the end, creates opportunities for students. And that’s what I’m all about. This past year, I improved on bringing in some amazing outside professors and professionals as speakers in my classes. I’ve continued to grow and build relationships for internships and hands-on learning opportunities here in the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia. As our Strategic Communication concentration finishes out its first cohort of students this spring, I’m aiming to continue to build in this area. Next fall, I’m hoping to possibly teach a new class, thus deepening the education I’m providing my students.
  2. Tenure – This one is out of my hands at the moment. 🙂 I’ve already put in my application for tenure this past October. Needless to say, a long term goal for the past 5 and 1/2 years has been to earn tenure. This spring is when I’ll find out!

Big Picture Dream:

Finally, I spent a good deal of time this past semester thinking about that “next step” for the strategic communication concentration as it grows past the graduation of our first cohort this upcoming spring.

  1. A Social Media Listening/Command Center –  Picture a place where students can go to monitor social media, track trends, perform analytics and more. Think of your favorite brands. In all likelihood, they have such a command center.
    I would love to build a small social media listening or command center for the students here in our department. We currently use Hootsuite Universitiy for our Social Media class, which is an amazing tool for monitoring and scheduling social media. But, it is not a metrics platform. I’d love to add to that an analytics tool for looking at trends. Several larger programs have such command centers, such as Clemson and Illinois State’s SMACC (by the way, Nathan Carpenter who runs SMACC is amazing. He was so generous with his time telling me about their impressive initiative have developed programs like this. His energy, knowledge, and initiative are extremely motivating). We’re a small program and the biggest hurdle is access to metrics software.  And so it is going to take some creative problem-solving to make this listening center a reality for my students (I’m very open to your suggestions, ideas, or interest in this project – Tweet me). I wrote about the need to up our offerings for teaching metrics back in February and expressed some ideas and frustrations on the issue. I believe integrating a command center with classes and extra-curricular opportunities is a worthy, long-term goal that will have  an enormous impact on our students and our community.

The year ahead is filled with promise. And these are some of things I would love to accomplish. I hope this post helped you think about your process, outcome, and dream goals for 2016!

Let me know what your goals are in the comments. If you have suggestions on how I can optimize my goals, please let me know.

I hope your 2015 was amazing, productive, and rewarding. Best of luck in 2016!

-Cheers!

Matt

photo CC credits Celestine Chua

How Guest Professors Build Bridges For Students

Building bridges.

That’s something we professors strive to create in the minds of our students. You might say it is the core mission of everything we do.

So how can we do that?

Recently, I’ve had a few amazing experiences that have really helped me to take a second look at one truly powerful way to help students build bridges between the classroom and the larger world. And, it is a simple solution: Guest lectures via Skype with leading professors in the field.

This past Tuesday, students in my Public Relations and Social Media classes each had the opportunity to hear from expert educators and leaders in the field. In the morning, Dr. Karen Freberg of the University of Louisville gave an inspiring look into the world of crisis communication and social media to my Principles of Public Relations class. In the afternoon, Dr. Diana Sisson, assistant professor of public relations at the School of Communication & Journalism at Auburn University, – an up and coming star – provided an insightful and thought-provoking look into reputation management in the social space. It was a true pleasure to expose my students to both of them.

Having had such wonderful professors into my class has sent me a clear message: This is something I need to do more of.

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Dr. Sisson’s presentation on online reputation management.

Here is what I learned about the power of sharing your class with awesome professors:

  1. It’s A Phenomenal Use of Class Time. While I’ve been a guest lecture in many classes over the years, I haven’t done a lot to bring in other professors into my classes. I think it stems from the “But, I have so much I want to cover and so little time!” feeling. I’m the world’s biggest micro-planner when it comes to classes. Every moment of my classes has (at least in my mind) a purpose building towards the next lecture. I have this nagging anxiety, “what if we don’t talk about X!? Then they won’t understand Y!” as though it will create this massive cascade, and everything I hoped and dreamed of teaching after that day will fall apart. But the truth is, it doesn’t. In fact, bringing other faculty into your class has some very powerful effects that outweigh any anxiety about not educating your students.
  2. It reaffirms concepts you are teaching your students – Of course, having a guest exposes students to new areas of expertise that you as a professor may not be the expert in. Isn’t that a major reason of bringing someone in? But, along with learning new things, students hear ideas you’ve already discussed in class sprinkled in. And this repetition from a different, outside source acts as a 3rd party endorsement for the construct. I could see it in the eyes of some students when things they’d heard came back up. It was as if they were saying, “Oh, so this other professor said it too, so it must be true.” And hearing a concept in a different context from a different authority helps students build bridges between what they already know and the new information they are being exposed to.

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    Dr. Freberg discussed crisis communication and social media
  3. It makes the classroom “real” for students – Hearing Dr. Freberg’s experience as a Plank Center Fellow with General Motors helped students see real world applications of concepts we discuss in class.  Hearing Dr. Sisson discuss tips and ideas for relationship management from her own experiences working in the health care sector, helped my social media students think about their own class project creating the social media for our department and how we can overcome some of the challenges we face in building and maintaining relationships. These bridges push students forward.
  4. It creates a networking opportunity for the students – Both Dr. Freberg and Dr. Sisson are incredibly giving of their time, their expertise, and their social capital – offering to help students learn and build their professional network. Several students have already taken action, engaging with both professors and I was proud of their motivation to capitalize on the generous offerings by both professors. Which leads me to…
  5. Breaking Down Walls. While this post is all about building bridges, it is also a tale of breaking down classroom walls. This is at the center of much of what we are trying to do: Bringing the world into the classroom and the classroom into the world. Having another professor come into your classroom does just that. We have to keep in mind that students are just beginning to build their networks – many don’t have a professional network at all.  Getting a chance to meet faculty from other universities opens doors to the resources of those faculty. And, all great faculty have something in common – they are here to help students grow and succeed. It doesn’t matter if the students are enrolled in their class or yours. They want all students to thrive and realize their dreams.

If you haven’t had either Dr. Sisson or Dr. Freberg chat with your class and you are teaching social media or PR, I highly recommend you do so!

 

 

What Faculty Can Learn from Dennis Yu, a Leader in Social Media Marketing

Yesterday, I had the amazing opportunity to have a true industry leader speak with students in my Social Media class here at Shepherd.

Dennis Yu, the CTO of BlitzMetrics, kindly donated his time to share his insights and experiences. The result?

It is safe to say that all of us left the room energized and inspired.

I’ve learned so much from Dennis in the few weeks we’ve been chatting over email and have found BlitzMetrics site to be a wealth of educational tools.

The focus of the chat yesterday was on personal branding, social media, and becoming a leader. Here are a few things I took from talk that I believe all of us, as professors, can incorporate.

Elevate Others

Dennis reminded us that credibility is not what you say you are. And neither is your personal brand. Your personal brand – your entire social identity – is what others say you are.

In other words, to have credibility you need to “get influential people to say good things about you.” So how do you do that?

Dennis has a great talk on YouTube in which he discusses the idea of using your power to elevate others.  Rather than blasting photos of our food, Dennis says we should use social media as a way to help other people. Seems intuitive, right? Unfortunately, it often isn’t.  Many have maligned the social media generation as being self-interested, motivating by one single idea: “Look at me.”

Shift: Instead, we can make a simple shift in our behavior that can pay dividends: We can focus our social media attention to get people to “look at others.”

As faculty, we are in a natural position to help people “look at others.” Here are 3 things we can do:

  • Highlight amazing work of our students and bring attention to their successes. We are our students’ greatest advocates and cheer leaders. Social media serves as an amazing sounding board for highlighting our current and former students. No one is doing this better, in my opinion, than Karen Freberg with her awesome #ProudProf blog posts highlighting the work her former students are doing.
  • Bring attention to other faculty. Many in academia look at academia as a zero sum game, where in order for me to gain you need to lose. I think the ‘publish or perish’ mentality hammered into our heads in graduate school cultivates this competitive atmosphere. But, the truth is, I’ve had my greatest successes by building relationships with others, not trying to beat them to get published or gain recognition. My greatest scholarly achievements and productivity has come from working with brilliant scholars. Two of the many great scholars I’ve had a chance to work with, I met in graduate school: Francis Dalisay and Masahiro Yamamoto.  The impulse may be to think, “look what I have accomplished.” I think we’re all better served when we think, “look at who has helped me accomplish.” Because, without others, how far can we really go?
  • Seek opportunities that benefit others. One of my absolute favorite things is when brands and software companies help higher education. If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know I’m a huge fan of Hootsuite University. And the reason is because they create opportunities to help students and faculty by providing them with free access to Hootsuite Pro and an awesome online education tool. Of course, this helps me. And, it helps my students. But, you don’t have to be a large company like Hootsuite to help others. If you have a skill or knowledge, share it. If you are a faculty member and you aren’t blogging, start doing so. If you create lesson plans, lectures, and syllabi, share them on your blog, on LinkedIn, or sites like SlideShare or Scribd. For example, Don Stanley, who teaches at UW Madison, does an awesome job of posting educational videos about social media on LinkedIn. If you create research tools, open them up to the community to learn from. Recently, I learned a ton about data visualization from Deen Freelong’s website that contains tutorials, curated lists of software, and more.  It is not about competing to be the best professor, it is about helping all of us help advance scholarship and help our students.
  • Be Thankful. There is a lesson to be learned when amazing, super busy, and highly sought after people like Dennis take time out of their schedule to chat with a small class of students. I am more than happy to tell the world about my positive experiences with BlitzMetrics and Hootsuite University. Whenever others help us, we have the power to thank them in a social way.  So, thank you Dennis!

In his talk, Dennis said: “You are the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.” In other words, the better you make those around you, the better off you are. I couldn’t agree more!