All posts by profkushin

What Faculty Can Learn from Dennis Yu, a Leader in Social Media Marketing

Yesterday, I had the amazing opportunity to have a true industry leader speak with students in my Social Media class here at Shepherd.

Dennis Yu, the CTO of BlitzMetrics, kindly donated his time to share his insights and experiences. The result?

It is safe to say that all of us left the room energized and inspired.

I’ve learned so much from Dennis in the few weeks we’ve been chatting over email and have found BlitzMetrics site to be a wealth of educational tools.

The focus of the chat yesterday was on personal branding, social media, and becoming a leader. Here are a few things I took from talk that I believe all of us, as professors, can incorporate.

Elevate Others

Dennis reminded us that credibility is not what you say you are. And neither is your personal brand. Your personal brand – your entire social identity – is what others say you are.

In other words, to have credibility you need to “get influential people to say good things about you.” So how do you do that?

Dennis has a great talk on YouTube in which he discusses the idea of using your power to elevate others.  Rather than blasting photos of our food, Dennis says we should use social media as a way to help other people. Seems intuitive, right? Unfortunately, it often isn’t.  Many have maligned the social media generation as being self-interested, motivating by one single idea: “Look at me.”

Shift: Instead, we can make a simple shift in our behavior that can pay dividends: We can focus our social media attention to get people to “look at others.”

As faculty, we are in a natural position to help people “look at others.” Here are 3 things we can do:

  • Highlight amazing work of our students and bring attention to their successes. We are our students’ greatest advocates and cheer leaders. Social media serves as an amazing sounding board for highlighting our current and former students. No one is doing this better, in my opinion, than Karen Freberg with her awesome #ProudProf blog posts highlighting the work her former students are doing.
  • Bring attention to other faculty. Many in academia look at academia as a zero sum game, where in order for me to gain you need to lose. I think the ‘publish or perish’ mentality hammered into our heads in graduate school cultivates this competitive atmosphere. But, the truth is, I’ve had my greatest successes by building relationships with others, not trying to beat them to get published or gain recognition. My greatest scholarly achievements and productivity has come from working with brilliant scholars. Two of the many great scholars I’ve had a chance to work with, I met in graduate school: Francis Dalisay and Masahiro Yamamoto.  The impulse may be to think, “look what I have accomplished.” I think we’re all better served when we think, “look at who has helped me accomplish.” Because, without others, how far can we really go?
  • Seek opportunities that benefit others. One of my absolute favorite things is when brands and software companies help higher education. If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know I’m a huge fan of Hootsuite University. And the reason is because they create opportunities to help students and faculty by providing them with free access to Hootsuite Pro and an awesome online education tool. Of course, this helps me. And, it helps my students. But, you don’t have to be a large company like Hootsuite to help others. If you have a skill or knowledge, share it. If you are a faculty member and you aren’t blogging, start doing so. If you create lesson plans, lectures, and syllabi, share them on your blog, on LinkedIn, or sites like SlideShare or Scribd. For example, Don Stanley, who teaches at UW Madison, does an awesome job of posting educational videos about social media on LinkedIn. If you create research tools, open them up to the community to learn from. Recently, I learned a ton about data visualization from Deen Freelong’s website that contains tutorials, curated lists of software, and more.  It is not about competing to be the best professor, it is about helping all of us help advance scholarship and help our students.
  • Be Thankful. There is a lesson to be learned when amazing, super busy, and highly sought after people like Dennis take time out of their schedule to chat with a small class of students. I am more than happy to tell the world about my positive experiences with BlitzMetrics and Hootsuite University. Whenever others help us, we have the power to thank them in a social way.  So, thank you Dennis!

In his talk, Dennis said: “You are the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.” In other words, the better you make those around you, the better off you are. I couldn’t agree more!

 

My Fall 2014 Social Media Class Project In Review

shepherdcommunication-socialmedia
Typo! What happens when I Tweet from my phone while in a rush. 😛

In the last few posts, I’ve been writing about my Social Media class and the semester project we’ve been doing. To recap, students create a social media content strategy for our department’s social media (the details of the assignment are on the previous post). They then use this plan to create content for the department. They create content 3  times, each time they are creating content for a certain time period. The content is presented to the class and then goes through an editorial process (i.e.., I grade them and make any needed mods) if needed before being published.

With the semester winding down, I want to share some of the work the students have been doing!

Students have done a great job across the semester and have worked hard to try to create content that will resonate with students while also targeting our goals and conveying our key messages. Running an account for a small university department is a unique challenge. Although as professors we are exhilarated by what we teach and have a love and passion for school, it is a bit tougher to get students excited about, well, that part of the college experience responsible for all the work they have to do. 🙂 Believe it or not, school is the last thing some students want to be thinking about when they aren’t in class. 🙂 And I think having to try to overcome the challenge of promoting school is a great experience for students. I’m very pleased with how the students have done in the face of these challenges. The semester began with very little content on our accounts, and few followers.

Students have done a particularly strong job working between groups to create content that works across platforms. For example, you’ll see how some of our blog posts tie into our Instagram and Twitter in regard to profiles of students and faculty.

Our class was divided into 3 groups:

Twitter – Prior to the class starting, we had a Twitter account but it was rarely posted to. Now, we have a variety of content from the informative to reminders of important dates to community-building memes and humorous posts students in our department can relate to.
Blog – The blog is brand new and our department hasn’t done much to publicize it yet. But students have done a great job getting it going. We’ve had highlights of students and insights into classes and events students are apart of. Note: Part of the reason it hasn’t been publicized, is the university is in a tradition stage with its website. And we are waiting to see how that will impact our online presence.
Instagram – Similar to Twitter, Instagram was something we had set up. But hadn’t done much with before the semester. Our Instagram team  began creating videos to highlight professors and students (we’ve had a few sound issues, but are working them out). These videos are accompanied by photos of the individual “behind the scenes.” There are also other photos of other events.

Students have one more round of content they will be turning in this week. And that content will be scheduled to carry us through the winter break.

Altogether, I’m very pleased with how students have worked to help humanize our department and enable current students to connect with one another and perspective students to get a look at who we are and what we do.  I feel we are moving in the right direction.  In the last few days, interest in our content has really taken off as students have reached out and begun highlighting the work their fellow students are doing. I am excited to see how the department’s social media grows and advances in time.

Is this a project I would do again? Absolutely. Students really bought into this project and worked hard to see it through. They expressed to me that they learned a lot from the class and doing this project. And, they said they enjoyed the opportunity to get hands-on experience. It was a very fun semester! I had a great bunch of students and I am very proud of all of them! I plan to continue with this assignment next year.

I’m not teaching Social Media next semester. So where will the department’s social media content for Spring 2014 come from? I’m not entirely sure yet. But I’ve got some ideas in the works and a strong foundation to build upon!

Thoughts? Questions? Recommendations for this project? Would love your comments and feedback below or send me a Tweet.
– Cheers!
Matt