How Guest Professors Build Bridges For Students

Building bridges.

That’s something we professors strive to create in the minds of our students. You might say it is the core mission of everything we do.

So how can we do that?

Recently, I’ve had a few amazing experiences that have really helped me to take a second look at one truly powerful way to help students build bridges between the classroom and the larger world. And, it is a simple solution: Guest lectures via Skype with leading professors in the field.

This past Tuesday, students in my Public Relations and Social Media classes each had the opportunity to hear from expert educators and leaders in the field. In the morning, Dr. Karen Freberg of the University of Louisville gave an inspiring look into the world of crisis communication and social media to my Principles of Public Relations class. In the afternoon, Dr. Diana Sisson, assistant professor of public relations at the School of Communication & Journalism at Auburn University, – an up and coming star – provided an insightful and thought-provoking look into reputation management in the social space. It was a true pleasure to expose my students to both of them.

Having had such wonderful professors into my class has sent me a clear message: This is something I need to do more of.

2015-11-10 15.26.34
Dr. Sisson’s presentation on online reputation management.

Here is what I learned about the power of sharing your class with awesome professors:

  1. It’s A Phenomenal Use of Class Time. While I’ve been a guest lecture in many classes over the years, I haven’t done a lot to bring in other professors into my classes. I think it stems from the “But, I have so much I want to cover and so little time!” feeling. I’m the world’s biggest micro-planner when it comes to classes. Every moment of my classes has (at least in my mind) a purpose building towards the next lecture. I have this nagging anxiety, “what if we don’t talk about X!? Then they won’t understand Y!” as though it will create this massive cascade, and everything I hoped and dreamed of teaching after that day will fall apart. But the truth is, it doesn’t. In fact, bringing other faculty into your class has some very powerful effects that outweigh any anxiety about not educating your students.
  2. It reaffirms concepts you are teaching your students – Of course, having a guest exposes students to new areas of expertise that you as a professor may not be the expert in. Isn’t that a major reason of bringing someone in? But, along with learning new things, students hear ideas you’ve already discussed in class sprinkled in. And this repetition from a different, outside source acts as a 3rd party endorsement for the construct. I could see it in the eyes of some students when things they’d heard came back up. It was as if they were saying, “Oh, so this other professor said it too, so it must be true.” And hearing a concept in a different context from a different authority helps students build bridges between what they already know and the new information they are being exposed to.

    Dr. Freberg discussed crisis communication and social media
  3. It makes the classroom “real” for students – Hearing Dr. Freberg’s experience as a Plank Center Fellow with General Motors helped students see real world applications of concepts we discuss in class.  Hearing Dr. Sisson discuss tips and ideas for relationship management from her own experiences working in the health care sector, helped my social media students think about their own class project creating the social media for our department and how we can overcome some of the challenges we face in building and maintaining relationships. These bridges push students forward.
  4. It creates a networking opportunity for the students – Both Dr. Freberg and Dr. Sisson are incredibly giving of their time, their expertise, and their social capital – offering to help students learn and build their professional network. Several students have already taken action, engaging with both professors and I was proud of their motivation to capitalize on the generous offerings by both professors. Which leads me to…
  5. Breaking Down Walls. While this post is all about building bridges, it is also a tale of breaking down classroom walls. This is at the center of much of what we are trying to do: Bringing the world into the classroom and the classroom into the world. Having another professor come into your classroom does just that. We have to keep in mind that students are just beginning to build their networks – many don’t have a professional network at all.  Getting a chance to meet faculty from other universities opens doors to the resources of those faculty. And, all great faculty have something in common – they are here to help students grow and succeed. It doesn’t matter if the students are enrolled in their class or yours. They want all students to thrive and realize their dreams.

If you haven’t had either Dr. Sisson or Dr. Freberg chat with your class and you are teaching social media or PR, I highly recommend you do so!



What Faculty Can Learn from Dennis Yu, a Leader in Social Media Marketing

Yesterday, I had the amazing opportunity to have a true industry leader speak with students in my Social Media class here at Shepherd.

Dennis Yu, the CTO of BlitzMetrics, kindly donated his time to share his insights and experiences. The result?

It is safe to say that all of us left the room energized and inspired.

I’ve learned so much from Dennis in the few weeks we’ve been chatting over email and have found BlitzMetrics site to be a wealth of educational tools.

The focus of the chat yesterday was on personal branding, social media, and becoming a leader. Here are a few things I took from talk that I believe all of us, as professors, can incorporate.

Elevate Others

Dennis reminded us that credibility is not what you say you are. And neither is your personal brand. Your personal brand – your entire social identity – is what others say you are.

In other words, to have credibility you need to “get influential people to say good things about you.” So how do you do that?

Dennis has a great talk on YouTube in which he discusses the idea of using your power to elevate others.  Rather than blasting photos of our food, Dennis says we should use social media as a way to help other people. Seems intuitive, right? Unfortunately, it often isn’t.  Many have maligned the social media generation as being self-interested, motivating by one single idea: “Look at me.”

Shift: Instead, we can make a simple shift in our behavior that can pay dividends: We can focus our social media attention to get people to “look at others.”

As faculty, we are in a natural position to help people “look at others.” Here are 3 things we can do:

  • Highlight amazing work of our students and bring attention to their successes. We are our students’ greatest advocates and cheer leaders. Social media serves as an amazing sounding board for highlighting our current and former students. No one is doing this better, in my opinion, than Karen Freberg with her awesome #ProudProf blog posts highlighting the work her former students are doing.
  • Bring attention to other faculty. Many in academia look at academia as a zero sum game, where in order for me to gain you need to lose. I think the ‘publish or perish’ mentality hammered into our heads in graduate school cultivates this competitive atmosphere. But, the truth is, I’ve had my greatest successes by building relationships with others, not trying to beat them to get published or gain recognition. My greatest scholarly achievements and productivity has come from working with brilliant scholars. Two of the many great scholars I’ve had a chance to work with, I met in graduate school: Francis Dalisay and Masahiro Yamamoto.  The impulse may be to think, “look what I have accomplished.” I think we’re all better served when we think, “look at who has helped me accomplish.” Because, without others, how far can we really go?
  • Seek opportunities that benefit others. One of my absolute favorite things is when brands and software companies help higher education. If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know I’m a huge fan of Hootsuite University. And the reason is because they create opportunities to help students and faculty by providing them with free access to Hootsuite Pro and an awesome online education tool. Of course, this helps me. And, it helps my students. But, you don’t have to be a large company like Hootsuite to help others. If you have a skill or knowledge, share it. If you are a faculty member and you aren’t blogging, start doing so. If you create lesson plans, lectures, and syllabi, share them on your blog, on LinkedIn, or sites like SlideShare or Scribd. For example, Don Stanley, who teaches at UW Madison, does an awesome job of posting educational videos about social media on LinkedIn. If you create research tools, open them up to the community to learn from. Recently, I learned a ton about data visualization from Deen Freelong’s website that contains tutorials, curated lists of software, and more.  It is not about competing to be the best professor, it is about helping all of us help advance scholarship and help our students.
  • Be Thankful. There is a lesson to be learned when amazing, super busy, and highly sought after people like Dennis take time out of their schedule to chat with a small class of students. I am more than happy to tell the world about my positive experiences with BlitzMetrics and Hootsuite University. Whenever others help us, we have the power to thank them in a social way.  So, thank you Dennis!

In his talk, Dennis said: “You are the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.” In other words, the better you make those around you, the better off you are. I couldn’t agree more!


Book Review: Alone Together by Sherry Turkle

Alone Together Sherry Turkle book


Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less From Each Other by Sherry Turkle is not the sort of book I tend to review on this blog. I usually talk about books that you might find useful to integrate in university classes aimed at teaching about professional uses social media and related subject.

Alone Together, on the other hand, is a cautionary tale.

This year Alone Together is the Common Reading book here at Shepherd University. And, as a member of the committee, I had the chance to read it.

The book is a detailed review of years of Turkle’s research from her time exploring the early days of artificial intelligence as a graduate student at MIT up through contemporary times where smart phones, video games, and virtual worlds have become a conduit for our interactions with others.

The book can be divided into two parts: The first half explores the growing intrusion of of A.I. into our lives and its effect. Turkle takes exception to the dominant narrative that robots – from Furby’s intended as play pals for children to robotic pets designed to serve as companions for the elderly – are inherently positive. This is the “expect more from technology” part of the argument. Turkle asks why is it that we are wanting robotic pets instead of genuine friendships, or even pets? Why is it that many are hoping one day to have robots that can care for the elderly or serve as love interests?  And what’s the cost for both the individuals these technologies aim to serve and society as a whole? The book traces the progression towards humanizing technology, increasing expectations, and shifting attitudes towards accepting technology as capable of ‘thinking’ on towards capable of ‘feeling.’

The second half of the book is about ‘why we expect less from each other.’ This, of course, is tied to why we expect more from technology. A large part of this portion of the book is the various ways in which we are hoping that technology can serve to take away the pains, discomforts, or awkwardness of dealing with others. Break ups over text-message, Second Life romances with persons we’ve never seen or met offline, and using IM or dating websites to flirt, are all examples of this. Another theme is how we construct our identities and craft an image of ourselves through Facebook (or blogs such as this :) ). A major theme that touched home to me, is streamlining and efficiency. For example, because we are so busy, it is more convenient to text or email to get things done. There’s no time to sit and chat – both parties are busy. We’ve got to get straight to the point. I admit, this is a behavior I am very guilty of. Efficiency and maximizing productivity are things I highly value. I often find it much more effective to email about work-related things.

With the rise of social media, and tools like Skype, there is such promise for connectivity. We can extend our senses across the world, as McLuhan stated. Yet, are we taking time to be with others? Or, are we blasting away messages into space, like Tweets that no one will read because we feel we need to have a consistent presence? But, the more we post the more content there is, and the greater the competition for the attention of those we want to reach.

It is an unknown place we are all rushing towards (And, I admit, that I took a detour once or twice while writing this blog post to check Facebook and Twitter).

It is fair to say that our society has become optimistically obsessed with technology. And, I am not exception to that. After all, this is a blog about technology and how we can 1) use it as a tool to teach our students, and 2) how our students should learn and understand it to advance their careers and, I hope, seek fulfillment in their careers.

In terms of the purpose of this blog:

We are wise to remind ourselves that just because we call something social media doesn’t mean that we are using it functionally for social purposes.

Turkle is skeptical of technological optimism. And, for that reason, I thank her for the opportunity to put my own relationship in technology on review.

Have I been using social media socially? Or, have I been using it as a broadcast platform? Is it bringing me connections, enrichment, and the opportunity to help others, enrich others, and build lasting relationships? (A recent article, explored that social relationships are and always will be a major predictor of happiness and well-being. Turkle’s work is cited in the article).

We talk a lot about ‘engagement’ on social media as a key metric. But, what are we measuring when we measure engagement? Are they simply behaviors or lasting emotional connections and relationships?

If you’re interested in a journey exploring our complex relationship with technology, this book is a worthwhile read. I believe we can only gain by exploring and reflecting on our own relationships and biases about technology.

#Hokies Tweets Network Visualization: How I extracted Tweets via TAGS 6 and visualized them in Gephi

Click to see larger or download.
Click to see larger or download.

A professional development goal of mine is to learn a lot more about social network analysis and visualization of social media data. This area has grown increasingly valuable and important in our field.  And I believe we all need to have at least a base knowledge of social data and how to play with it.

With my wife traveling for work and rainy weather here in West Virginia, this weekend presented a great opportunity to finally get my feat wet (no pun intended).

As you may know, my beloved Virginia Tech Hokies haven’t been playing so well this college football season.  So I decided to use Saturday’s game as an opportunity to play with Twitter data and Gephi, an open source data visualization program.

I’ll explain what I did below to make the above visualization in case you’d like to try this for yourself. This is a simple approach and I think you’ll find you can do it if I can learn it in a weekend! I started Saturday morning with zero knowledge of graph theory, social network analysis, how to use Gephi, and how to pull down Tweets.

I’m writing this up because I found several tutorials online. But, none of them quite came together to show me how to do all the parts in one tutorial. A major reason is that the Twitter API has changed since many tutorials available online were built. So, the ways offered for getting the Twitter data on those tutorials no longer works.  As such, getting Twitter data is a challenge if you don’t know a little programming with Python, etc (Needless to say, I don’t).

Fortunately, each of the tools together below made this first experiment in Twitter data visualization possible.

Here’s how I did it:

1) I used the TAGS v.6 Twitter Archiving Tool to gather Tweets with the hashtag #hokies. This is an amazing, free tool – thank you so much to Martin Hawksey for this! You can learn to use the TAGS archiver fairly easily via Google Docs. The only real slow down is that you have to get a Twitter API key via your Twitter account.

I ended up gathering 1583 Tweets between 3:19am – after midnight before the game – and the majority of the way through the game at 2:43. So, whatever Tweets going back I could pull when I extracted the data at 2:43; not a great picture of the #Hokies conversation, but it worked for this exercise.

2) I used @DFeelon’s spreadsheet converter to convert the TAGS spreadsheet to a file I could put into GEPHI to do the visualization. Thanks Deen!

His converter pulls only the first Twitter account that is mentioned in the Tweet or in a RT – so any additional persons mentioned in a Tweet were not counted. You can learn more about it here on Deen’s blog. It is easy to use. In short, I copied my Tweeter and Tweet text into his spreadsheet, and voila! This created my edge file in CSV for GEPHI with 2 columns (vertices, or nodes) – the first column being the person who sent the Tweet and the second column being the person to whom the Tweet was directed.

3) I noticed that some mentions of Twitter account handles were all lowercase whereas others were not. This had created duplicate nodes. That is, in some instances, one Twitter account had been split into two: an all lowercase version and the original. So, I simply made all text lowercase to address this problem. I used Google Refine to clean my CSV file because I want to learn to use this program. But, you could change the case in Excel or any spreadsheet software.

4) I then loaded the cleaned CSV file into Gephi (download it here) so I could do the visualization.

5) I spent a lot of time on Saturday reading about visualization and getting a basic knowledge of graph theory and how to use Gephi. While I’ve still got a lot to learn, I decided to follow a tutorial for my first “go round.” It seemed like a great opportunity to put together concepts and tools in Gephi that I’d learned in a guided environment. So, I followed the instructions on the latter half of this YouTube video for how to visualize the data and export it into the file you see with this post. The tutorial is by Michael Bauer via the International Journalism Festival. Of note, the first half shows you how to extract data using Twitter’s old API and that process no longer works. So you can take your CSV file gained through the process above, import it into Gephi, and pick up with the tutorial at 1:05:46.

So, that’s it!

A few quick things about this visualization:

As indicated by the size of the Twitter account name, we can see that Virginia Tech sports beat writer Andy Bitter for the Roanoke Times had the largest number of Tweets directed at him regarding the game (that is, his node – his Twitter account – had the most degrees. The degrees are the number of edges, or connections one node has to another). This makes sense. I’ve followed the #Hokies conversation on Twitter for years and Andy has been a constant presence and leader in providing news and analysis of Tech.

The communities are indicated in colors. I used the modularity script in Gephi to identify these, as is shown in the above-noted YouTube video. In short, you can use the color coding to make a basic clustering of who is talking to who.

In Closing:

While I’ve got a ton to learn, I’m thrilled with the progress I’ve made in just over a weekend from not knowing the first thing about graph theory, basic spreadsheet formatting for nodes and edges, or how to visualize a social network, to building my first visualization. And, while my goal is not to become a data scientist, I am excited to continue to learn and grow a base knowledge in this area. I know I am just scraping the tip of the iceberg.

I’d love to hear your thoughts and tips on how I can improve my knowledge and skills! Also, please feel free to share your tips, tutorials, and experiences with social data.


Note: Thanks to Nathan Carpenter at the ISU SMACC for helping me get started with data gathering and visualization by generously sharing his experiences and tools!

Social Media Book Review: Jab Jab Jab Right Hook by Gary Vaynerchuck

Finding great social media books to use as texts in a social media class can be a challenge. The space is constantly changing and there is so much we need to teach our students.

Personally, I’m always looking. That’s why this summer I read Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World by Gary Vaynerchuck. Here are 2 areas where the book excels.

jab jab jab right hook vaynerchuck

1) Emphasis on the “jab”

The jab in this case is your social content that does not aim to sell or promote a product. It is the content that builds the relationship with the audience. The basic premise of this book is that in order to hit your customer with a “right hook” to knock them down (i.e., get them to buy), you have to set them up with a lot of little jabs. It is these jabs – pieces of content that are native to the platform and speaks to the interests of your followers – that get them to pay attention to you. Gary’s argument, then, is that the reason most people get social media wrong is because they try to advertise on social media. Since everyone hates being advertised to, people don’t pay attention. In other words, most people try to take old approaches from other mediums and apply them to social media.

If, on the other hand, organizations provided value to their followers – via jabs – then their followers wouldn’t mind a little sales or promotional message – right hook – every once in a while.

This is an important lesson we are all seeking to teach our students. I’ve often spoken about things like the “80 20” rule. The boxing analogy makes it tangible for the reader – and I think students will easily relate to this.

So the question becomes, how do you create great jabs that customers are happy to take on the chin? It is this question that the book seeks to address. Vaynerchuck addresses this question with chapters on various social media channels with primary focus on Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

2) Mini “Case Study” Examples

At the end of each chapter is a long list of specific social media posts from various companies, big and small.  Gary deconstructs each social media posting, which is published in full color so you can see it how it would be on the screen. He explains the pros and cons of the post for that social platform. Also, he provides specific insights on how to improve the post. These detailed examples are great for anyone learning how to create better content. The advice is actionable and supporting reasoning is provided. I learned some great pointers from these sections of the book that I had not considered before. And I believe it has helped me create stronger content for myself. And, I’ve incorporated a few of his points into my lecture.

These examples along make the book worth a read. They have a great potential to help students learn how to make better content. In other social media books I’ve read or browsed, I have found a dearth of specific, clear, helpful examples to support what the author is seeking to teach. This is where Gary really adds value to the reader. He takes the time to get into specifics on post after post so that the reader isn’t left with just sweeping claims of what to do.

Most students understand how to make social content – since they create it and are around it all of the time. But my experience is that it can be very difficult to teach students how to make better content. I love this book for this reason!

The Verdict: Would I Use This Book In My Social Media Class?

In short, Yes. However, I didn’t adopt the book this semester. The biggest reason is that the due date for submitting our fall readings was during spring semester. I’ve always hated that policy though I understand the need for that much lead time. But, it tends to stifle my ability to find something new that I love and add it (When I’ve tried to throw a book on the syllabus as a required reading that wasn’t available in the bookstore in the past, students have not been too happy). So I added this book as a recommended read on my syllabus.

Of note, Gary has a “I’m not going to sugar coat it for you” style that is a part of his brand.  I mention this because it may not appeal to all readers. But, I can see a lot of students finding this style appealing as opposed to the more staid writing styles that prevail in most texts that make their way into the classroom.

I would not use this book as a standalone. It doesn’t offer a lot in the areas of analytics, for example. It is a book on how to create content – as the title suggests. So, I would suggest coupling it with other books and readings. In short, Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook is a useful addition for its emphasis on the hows of creating great content and why the advice provided is effective. It is a worthwhile read for both students, professors, and practitioners.

Books I currently use in my Social Media class:

  1. Likeable Social Media by Kerpen – this is a book I have used for several semesters and love. (there is an update version that I have not yet had time to read – the one linked here – that students have told me they really are enjoying).
  2. Your Brand, The Next Media Company by Brito  – this book is a little more challenging of a read for some students. But it is a great book and my second time using it.

What books do you use for your social media class? I’d love to know!

Social Media Documentary Recommendation: Generation Like

When I was in college, I remember watching “Merchants of Cool,” a PBS Frontline documentary chronicling the strategies marketers use to appeal to the elusive teenage demographic.

The documentary had a lasting impression on me. In it, Douglas Rushkoff explores the fascinating attempts by marketers to learn what is cool from teen trendsetters in order to replicate it and sell it back to them through brands like Nike.

In fact, I use snippets of Merchants of Cool in a lecture in my PR class to explore audience research, influence and opinion leaders (as well as to talk about authenticity and co-optation).

Merchants of Cool aired in 2001. To be honest, it is humorous to go back and watch it now, seeing as in 2001 I was in the general age range of the very people the video was profiling. In my defense, I did not like all of the music and fashion shown in the video – truth be told, I was never into Limp Bizkit. :)

How much things changed in a little over a decade. As you can imagine, when I was in college there was no social media and there certainly were no smart phones. Time spent on the Internet among young people was a fraction of what it is today.

What’s fascinating, is to compare that film to the February 2014 Frontline documentary “Generation Like.” This documentary, also by Rushkoff, explores teen culture today and its relationship with the world of marketing and promotion. This documentary is all about the relationship teens have with social media, and thus marketers have with teens via social media.

Rushkoff explores how little teens often know about how businesses are using social media to build relationships with them. From TV celebrities to would-be and established YouTube stars on through to marketing the Hunger Games movies, the documentary offers a fascinating look at what drives young people to use social media – both from the perspective of self-empowerment to building relationships with brands and celebs.

I seldom use class time to show clips longer than 5 or 10 minutes. But I found Generation Like to offer such a fascinating look at many sides of social media, culture, and business, that I showed Generation Like in my Social Media class last semester and did so again this semester. Students last semester thought the documentary offered such a great look into several concepts we covered in class, they suggested I show it earlier in the semester this year as a sort of primer. So I did. :)

The documentary offers an opportunity for a great discussion for any social media class. We had a wonderful debate on the implications of social media for society after watching it. If you haven’t seen it, I strongly recommend it. While it is a little over a year old, it is still very applicable.




What’s Changing for Fall 2015? Experimenting With My Principles of PR Semester-Long Project

Happy start to the semester!

I want to quickly provide an update on my plans this fall as we are jumping right into classes here at Shepherd University.  Longtime readers know that I like to start the semester by highlighting fun changes to my classes as I constantly work to improve the education I provide my students.

Innovation, experimentation, and iteration are at the heart of what we do as educators. So the beginning of the semester is an exciting “rubber meets the road” time for all of us.


This semester, I’ll highlight my Principles of Public Relations class – our overview course for students in the Strategic Communication concentration. This is a class I haven’t talked about on this blog, even though this class of course does cover some about social media (That’s because, on this blog I have tended to focus on more upper division classes that target social media specifically, and which go into greater depth).

To switch things up, here’s a word on a fun change for my Principles of Public Relations for Fall 2015:

The big development here is that I have updated my “semester long assignment” for the semester into a two-part project. Originally, students worked in teams to address a mock scenario involving an online clothing retailer. I loved this assignment. Students had so much fun and it was an amazing opportunity to see the creativity of our diverse group of students here in the department. The project brought in talents developed in our array of multimedia classes. Each semester, students would impress me by their videos, websites, print materials, and social media.

Yet, I felt this assignment needed to be tightened up. Perhaps because I provided such creative freedom, there could sometimes be a lack of depth or critical learning regarding the application of course content to message design and strategy. Instead, there tended to be too much focus on creating glossy content.

In their presentations, students were proposing generic solutions that sounded in my head a bit like: “Social media will solve all their problems.” I sighed, provided feedback, and wondered how I could help students starting off their education in public relations gain a more detailed, specified understanding of various communication channels (both established and emerging) and how they could be used to address a problem or goal.

To address this, I’ve added an assignment that comes earlier in the semester where students have to learn about, and present to the class, an educational workshop about an established or emerging channel for reaching a target public. For example, students will choose from a list including native advertising and Google Hangouts On Air.  In this way, each group educates the other groups about the channel, its affordances, and cases where the channel has been used in creative or innovative ways to achieve a communication goal. Once the students know a bit about their channel, they will move on to the second part of the project.

Like in the past, this entire project is built around a mock scenario. In the second part of the project, each team comes up with a strategy for using their channel in the context of the mock scenario. In other words, the team focuses narrowly on their channel and how it could be used. This emphasis on depth should provide a more nuanced understanding and a more targeted application of course concepts to a mock scenario.

Yes, it is a trade off. But, I believe this will better prepare the students as they move into the more advanced courses. I will have to take the greater depth at a loss of breadth – that is, the array of proposed strategies to addressing the problem that I got with the old way I did this assignment. Still, I believe learning a more in-depth understanding of one channel and how to really prepare a plan for its application at this stage in the game is better than getting a bevy of proposed solutions that have not been well thought through – a sort of ‘throw it against the wall and see what sticks’ approach.

My aim is that students will be able to take this depth of experience in one channel and put it to practice in various scenarios as they move up in their studies. What do you think?

Let’s see how it goes. :) I’m excited to find out!

I wish everyone the best as they dive into the semester and hope that your innovations, changes, and experiments in the classroom go great!



photo CC by TW Collins

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A Social Media Education Blog by Matthew J. Kushin, Ph.D.